Outside Cold Air Blowing in Behind Glove Box – Ford Explorer Or Jeep Grand Cherokee

Change of seasons sometimes reveals problems with a vehicle that would otherwise go unnoticed. If you have a Jeep Grand Cherokee or a Ford Explorer that has an outside air leak behind the glove box, then you may have a broken fresh air door (AKA Recirculate Door or Max Door). The fresh air door is used to either recirculate air in the passenger compartment or allow fresh air to enter the HVAC (Heating Ventilation & Air Conditioning) system. Surprisingly the Explorer and the Grand Cherokee share a common flaw in the heating and AC system. The fresh air doors are weak plastic that many times under the stress of the control actuator can break. When it’s cold outside this problem makes itself very apparent. In hotter climates in the summertime, a broken fresh air door drastically reduces the air conditioning’s efficiency.

Checking it is easy by operating the fresh air door and listening for increased airflow. When the climate control setting is moved to max, the sound of the air blowing through the vents should be louder because the fresh air door is sealing off the outside air, forcing the inside air to recirculate. If the sound is not louder, you can open the glove box door and look behind it for the operation of the door when switching the setting from normal to max. If the door is not visibly moving, it is likely that it has broken. The door sometimes can even fall to the bottom of the case, positioned right above the blower. It may not be in sight, sometimes you can stick your fingers through the plastic grate and feel the door laying loose on the bottom.

Replacement of the door is not a do it yourself job. The dash needs to be swung out and the HVAC case removed on Grand Cherokees. On Ford Explorers the job can be done without the removal of the case, but the assembly must be replaced. Obviously if the case needs to be removed, the refrigerant must be recovered, which requires an ac machine. So if you are mechanically inclined the one that may be done at home might be the Explorer, of course this depends on your mechanical ability. Even if you are not going to do this job yourself, this information can be used to help explain to the repair shop what the problem is. By providing more information to lead the technician to the problem area, diagnosis time can be reduced.

Flowmaster Super 40 Series Muffler Review

There are many that are considering buying an aftermarket muffler for their vehicle. There is a lot to choose from out there, all with their unique benefits and sound. I purchased the Flowmaster Super 40 Series Muffler. Flowmaster claims it to be one of their loudest, high flow mufflers. According to Flowmastermufflers.com “The Super 40 has that “deep powerful” sound of the original 40 series but with all the benefits of performance and low interior resonance from the “Delta Flow technology.” I have to say that I agree with the fact that it has a deep powerful sound, however, the interior resonance is significant. I have not heard the interior resonance of a delta flow, but the Super 40 Series still has quite a bit of interior resonance.

I put this muffler on a 2001 Toyota Tundra 4.7 Liter V8. I ordered the muffler online, and when it came I took it and the truck to a local muffler shop and had it installed. The shop simply cut out the stock muffler and installed the new one. The resonator was left alone. I also added a stainless steel tip. From day 1, I have been very impressed with the sound of it.

Between.5 & 2 RPM’s the sound is very throaty and deep, especially when I an really on it, however as my RPM’s increase above 2.5, the sound from the cab get a little quieter and the rev of the engine takes over the sound from the tail pipe. It still sounds really great in my opinion, it’s just not quite what I expected.

As far as performance is concerned, I feel that I have lost a little low end power. With high flow mufflers like this one, this can be common. The horsepower gains that are claimed are true, however, the increased horsepower is found at the higher RPMs. The loss in low end power is enough for me to notice, but not enough to make much of a difference. (I’m picky)

I have not noticed an increase in MPGs. I was hoping that I would, but it remained unchanged. (even with a K&N drop in air filter). I continue to get between 16 and 18 MPG.

Pros:

* Deep throaty sound in the cab and out.

* Great price.

* Increased power (high RPMs).

Cons:

* Not a stainless steel construction, instead it is painted. After several months of use, the lovely black paint has almost all burnt off.

* Around 65 – 70 mph, there is interior resonance that I just don’t like. It goes away at about 72 mph, so not a big deal. I liked it at first, but gets annoying after a while.

Overall, the Flowmaster Super 40 is a great product. I really like the sound of this muffler. It is deep, and smooth. It’s not raspy and “rackety”. It produces a powerful sound and really lets you hear the beast that the 4.7 Liter i-force is. It’s one of the best Toyota aftermarket parts I’ve purchased.

How to Put a V8 Motor in a Corvair

Sometimes a challenge is just that and no more. Not practical maybe but fun nonetheless. I owned at the time, a small shop repair shop where I would tinker with cars and motorcycles and make a few dollars as well. One afternoon during a bull session with some buddies, one of them said it would be neat if we could put a V8 motor in one of my Corvair cars. I had several of them and loved to tinker with the Monza model which was Chevy’s souped up version of this rear engined car. The Corvair had no independent frame and was one of the first uni-body cars on the market. Extremely lightweight, the six cylinder motor with the factory blower made the car zip right along. It really was a silly looking car in the first years of production, kinda boxy and square. Later models became more streamlined but suffered the same engineering problems of the early years and quickly the car faded into obscurity. I had one car with no motor and the body was not in the best of shape. I remember saying I could put the V8 in that car and the guys quickly put me to the challenge.

My shop had a pretty good assortment of tools, torches, welders, jacks and power hand tools that allowed me to make just about anything in metal. A big drill press, a good vise and tons of nuts and bolt

assortments put most of what I needed at hand. After the guys left the thought of doing this V8 conversion nagged at me and I found myself checking out the car to see if it was really possible. Putting the motor in the car could always be done but I thought how about doing it so you could not tell from the outside that the car was altered? At least until you started it up. There was no way I was going to be able to make that V8 motor sound like the wimpy six cylinder factory motor.

The first item on the agenda was to remove all the factory drive train components. Since the motor was already gone, the rear end, including the wheels were a snap to remove. I had a Chevy V8 short block that I could use for test fitting the engine into the trunk. The trunk of a Corvair was in the front of the car. A major amount of sheet metal had to be removed to squeeze the engine down into the truck compartment. I had to mock up the motor with some heads and intake manifold to assure the trunk lid (hood) would close after the engine was in place. Once I managed to get the engine into the trunk and was satisfied with it’s location, motor mounts became the next item to complete. Since there was no frame under the car I had to fabricate a partial sub-frame that was able to accept bolt-on motor mounts. I had several transmissions to choose from including a used manual three speed Chevy unit. This was a direct bolt-on to the V8 so in it went. Making a tail mount for the trans was nothing more than some three inch channel iron that spanned from one side of the car to the other. So far with the doors and hood closed the car looked stock. I purchased a used small pickup truck rear end and began altering it to fit under the Corvair body. No easy task I can say. Concealing fourteen inch wheels where thirteens were before required even more modification to the cars sheet metal including new wheel wells and interior wheel covers.

With the three major components of the drive train now mounted in the car, I was able to start on all the smaller items that a car needs to run. The drive shaft had to be custom made as it was less than three

feet long and needed a mid-point universal to offset the different heights of the transmission and the rear end. The radiator was made from an old V8 Chevy unit but had to be altered to be able to lay on its side. A friend of my Dads owned the local radiator repair shop and was more than wiling to do the alterations at almost no cost as he too thought the car was pretty neat. Wiring the car in those days was a simple task as there were none of the bells and whistles in cars today. No computers, no special sensors for this and that. Just whatever a car needed to run and work the lights and so on. I retained all the Chevy factory lights, turn signals and so on and really just needed to wire the engine components and battery. I placed the battery in the rear of the car as even then I realized the car was going to be light in the rear. What an understatement that was.

The conversion took about four months to do as I remember. There were a few bugs to work out of course as I had no engineering staff to advise me what I was doing wrong but all in all the bugs were pretty minor. The first time I started the car the thrill of hearing the motor growl under that hood cannot be described. The first time I put the car in gear and drove it around the property was a real kick. I purchased license plates for the car and drove it for a couple of weeks to work out the kinks and have time to complete some type of interior. I added only one other bucket seat as the car was not a touring car but would certainly be fun at the local drag strip. I clearly remember the first time I actually drove the car to my buddies house to show him the V8 motor in the car and take him for a ride. On a back road, holding one foot on the brake pedal and punching the gas with the other, I was able to smoke the tires with no effort at all. From a slow roll or moving at 40 MPH, punching the gas pedal would squeal the tires and create tire smoke instantly. The car was a real gas.

I drove the car that summer and had a ball taking it to Stewart’s drive-in in Paramus, New Jersey on Friday and Saturday nights. It was fun to have other guys laugh at the car and ask to race for papers. After a few races the laughter stopped. I didn’t take their papers but my little Corvair was a hit that summer with all the custom car guys. I sold the car that winter to a young fella who wanted to complete the interior and exterior paint. He drove the car for quite a while and then I lost track of it’s where abouts. I had already moved on to another project but I had proven that you could squeeze a V8 motor into a stock Corvair body.

Pete Ackerson

CCC Valuescope & USAA Conspiring to Defraud, Committing RICO Act Violations?

I am filing a consumer complaint against CCC Valuescope (CCCG) and my insurer USAA for falsely alleging a fair “market value” of my automobile.

My insurer USAA has breached its duty to exercise the utmost good faith to me its insured. By using CCC Valuescope (a company I allege violates the U.S. federal RICO Act) USAA has intentionally provided me a low and fraudulent valuation of my automobile in hopes of obtaining an unreasonable and unfair settlement.

CCC Valuescope (formerly known as CCC Information Services Group Inc – CCCG) can by no means be deemed a fair and market value of automobiles as CCC Valuescope works exclusively for insurers and therefore has an economic interest to supply valuations that are intentionally below the actual fair market value of what insured vehicles are truly worth.

It is known fact throughout the insurance industry that CCC gathers its values from what car dealers would sell a vehicle for at basement wholesale prices, not the true “retail value of an auto of like kind and quality prior to the accident” as mandated by FL insurance regulations. Moreover CCC Valuescope uses a mix of vehicles formerly leased, used, and abused among wrecked cars when compiling valuations to afford their insurance company customers paying out total losses the lowest possible “values” to present their insured.

Ironically, nearly every vehicle in CCC Valuescope’s appraisal of my car report consisted of vehicles that had over 20 records indicative of issues such as accidents and faulty cars. Among the report, some cars had 28, 31, and 32 records.

Cutting costs and denying its insured “the utmost due care” historically can be documented against USAA beginning with the class action lawsuit against USAA in Washington’s King County (March 12, 1999) for compelling auto repair shops to use “imitation” parts in repairs, while simultaneously hiding this practice from policyholders. Beyond auto insurance, USAA has countless complaints filed against it in 27 states across the country.

CCC Valuescope is not independent in their valuations since they are a hired gun for the insurance companies! Upon conducting a VIN search on the vehicles within the CCC report 39813905, many cars had over 20 records indicative of numerous collisions, issues with the vehicle, and several changes of ownership. By relying upon CCC’s intentionally low valuation of my vehicle, USAA is breaching its fiduciary duty to act in good faith in handling my claim. No fair and honest evaluation of my claim can be performed by CCC as it is contracted by insurers for the primary purpose of minimizing monies paid out by insurers to its fiduciaries. By using CCC Valuescope, USAA is clearly not exercising the “utmost due care” in the interest of me its insured as required by Baxter v. Royal Indemnity.

CCC admitted itself in its SEC Filing on 3-16-2005 that “the Company sometimes pays a new customer for the remaining commitment of its previous contract with third parties as an incentive”. In regard to regulation, CCC mentions in the same filing “in most states, however, there is no formal approval process for total loss valuation products”. CCC itself confesses in the same report “individual state departments of insurance have taken positions as to whether the use of CCC Valuescope valuations is in compliance with a states claim handling regulations”.

“The Company is aware that since 2002 the California Department of Insurance has advised some of the Company’s customers (which management estimates to be approximately 14% of the total revenue earned in 2004 from the Company’s CCC Valuescope valuation product and service) that the Department believed that their use of CCC Valuescope had not been in compliance with the California insurance regulations in effect prior to October 4, 2004, with respect to certain components of the products methodology. The Company believes the product was in compliance with the applicable California regulations.”

“On April 24, 2003, the California Department of Insurance formally adopted new regulations that required the Company to change its methodology for computing total loss valuations in California.” There is good reason therefore to believe CCC Valuescope’s valuation methodology is terribly flawed and skewed to favor its insurance company customers.

In CCC’s annual report filed February 13, 2004 the legal proceedings and numerous class action lawsuits against CCC are documented in pages 35, 42, 43, and 44 of the 53 page report.

On page 35, CCC Valuescope admits to setting aside $4.3 million as an estimate towards potential settlement to “resolve potential claims arising out of approximately 30% of the transaction volume of CCC Valuescope”.

By acknowledging 30% of transaction volume becoming potential claims, CCC Valuescope thereby makes it public record that it anticipates a sizeable percentage of lawsuits for unfair and fraudulent valuations. Such a high percentage of transaction volume alone attests to the flawed methodology of CCC’s report, its unscrupulous dealings, and wholehearted commitment to protect the financial interests of the insurers it serves.

Ironically, four of CCC Valuescope’s automobile insurance company customers have made contractual and, in some cases, also common law indemnification claims against CCC for litigation costs, attorneys’ fees, settlement payments and other costs allegedly incurred by them in connection with litigation relating to their use of CCC’s flawed TOTAL LOSS valuation product.

Certainly the countless class action lawsuits filed across the United States against CCC Valuescape provides further evidence concerning the grossly low and inaccurate valuations of vehicles they give the insurers they serve. Among the many are:

CCC Settles Class Action Suit on Valuation of Total Loss Vehicles (July 15, 2005)

Chicago-based claims software-maker CCC Information Services Inc. announced that it and 15 of its customers signed a settlement agreement with the plaintiffs in various class action suits pending in Madison County, Ill. These consolidated suits, Case Nos. 01 L 157, et al., relate to the valuation of vehicles that have been declared total losses by insurers.

Terms of the settlement agreement will require CCC to pay notice and administration fees and other costs associated with the settlement. The company estimates that these costs will total about $8 million, and including available insurance proceeds of $1.8 million, the company is fully reserved for these payments. Other settlement costs, including claims by class members, will be paid by the insurance companies that are participating in the settlement.

August 23, 2000, a putative statewide class action was filed in the Circuit Court for Hillsborough County, FL, against CCC and USAA Casualty Insurance Company (Peter Sintes et al. v. USAA Casualty Insurance Company and CCC Information Services, Inc., Case No. 00-006308). Plaintiffs allege that USAA contracted with CCC to provide valuations of “total loss” vehicles and that CCC supplied valuations that were intentionally below the actual fair market value of the insured vehicle.

Iinsurance companies “owe a duty to the insured to exercise the utmost good faith.” Baxter v. Royal Indemnity Company, 285 So.2d 652 (Fla. 1st DCA 1973).

Given the countless and ongoing class action lawsuits against CCC Valuescope there should now be no question that CCC Valuescope is not independent in its auto valuations and is guilty of violating the U.S. federal RICO Act and National Insurance Regulations, along with many of the complicit insurance companies such as USAA who willingly and knowingly use their product with the intent to deceive.

Having Toyota Prius Battery Problems? Options For Your Toyota Prius Battery Problems

The Toyota Prius is one of the cleanest vehicles out on the market today. It is very efficient and a great car to own. However these days some problems are being noticed with the Prius. The Toyota Prius battery problems are very annoying for the Prius owners and they are losing their trust with the car.

It has a lot of charging specifications that need to be fulfilled or else the Prius battery condition deteriorates. Toyota offers good ways which can solve their Toyota Prius battery problems which will make their customers happy. Due to this fact any problems faced by the Toyota owners are fixed by Toyota free of charge within the warranty period. And moreover the warranty period is quite long and worthy.

However if you fall under the type of customer whose warranty has expired then you should be able to get some help from this information.

Firstly, you can go to the Toyota dealers to get the battery replaced. This is one of the solutions to your Toyota Prius battery problems. The only problem is this will cost you around $4000. This is a steep price to pay to fix a used car.

The second option which is available to you is you can opt for a used replacement battery that is sold for a cheaper price. This price may be somewhere around $1500. This will also solve your Toyota Prius battery problems. There are risks involved in this as well. A lot of times you will not know how many miles are on the battery. Even though this price is cheaper it is still tough to spend $1500 on a used car. Who wants to spend a lot on an old car by replacing it with a completely new or used battery?

When I was facing Toyota Prius battery problems and was not able to spend a lot for a replacement battery for my old and used car, I found a guide on the net. This guide gave me instructions to rebuild my existing battery at home. Toyota Prius battery problems can be solved at home by making worthy use of this guide. It is very clear with its instructions and is very user friendly.

At first the problem I had was that I did not have the opportunity to rebuild a battery myself, I was just too busy. What I was going to do was hire my local mechanic for this work. He wanted me to give him this guide so he could fix it to my specifications.

I only had to spend about $500 for the items required to rebuild my existing battery myself. The estimate I got from my mechanic was only about $700 so either way I was saving money by doing it myself or having my local mechanic do it for me.

I was happily driving my Toyota Prius again. I was happy I found a low cost easy way to get rid of my Toyota Prius battery problems.

Auto Body Repair Estimates Demystified – The 5 Most Common Items on a Repair Estimate

So you’ve decided to get an estimate from a local body shop. These days, most body shops will use a computerized estimating software to write your estimate. If the shop you have chosen does not use a computer to write your estimate that should be cause for concern. This is not meant as a jab at those long time owners and technicians and I am not implying they are “backward” or “luddites” or ignorant. Its more for accountability. Computerized software is now standard in our industry and insures a more uniform, unbiased and accurate appraisal for how long things take to repair. For instance, I was talking to a shop owner just a couple days ago who was remembering with fondness the good old days when he would routinely get 15+ labor hours to repair frames on cars that nowadays he only gets 4-5 hours on. The truth is however that 4-5 is the more accurate and fair rate (depending on the job of course it could be more or less). And since consumers and insurance companies are billed by the hours on an estimate the old days of falsely inflating hours are gone.

When it comes to auto body repair the vast majority of line items on an estimate will be one of 5 things:

1. R & I. This is shorthand for “remove and install” and means to take something off your car and then to re-install it later. Parts that are not damaged may need to be temporarily removed to access another part that was damaged or more often so the panel it is taken off of can painted properly. For instance, say your electric motor for your window stops working. The interior trim panel will need to be temporarily removed for to gain access to the motor to see if it can be repaired (not likely!) or replaced. Or perhaps a molding needs to be removed from your door before it is painted only to be put back on later when the paint dries. One caution here is that if panels are being painted and you’re not being charged for R & I the shop may be taping them up which can actually cause peeling or flaking months or years later. So don’t be surprised if for instance a headlight needs to be removed to properly paint a fender. You should actually be more concerned if its not. FYI: R & I times are typically set to industry standards by estimating software and are not discretionary.

2. Repair. Repair (aka ‘Rpr’) is the most discretionary item on an estimate and typically the amount of time it takes to repair something will be underlined or asterisk-ed (*) to indicate this. This is where an insurance adjuster might say a dent will take 3 hours to fix and a technician might say it will take 4. There’s no hard and fast rule here and this needs to be negotiated between insurance adjusters, shop estimators and possibly even the technicians doing the job. My dad who has been in the industry almost 40 years taught me a long time ago that a dent which is about the size of a man’s fist should take about 3 hours to repair. From there you can adjust up or done for various things like a body line that runs through the dent (add an hour) or the dent has no creases and is accessible from the inside and therefore can be mostly popped out (subtract time). The reason these times are so important is that insurance companies are paying shops based on the number of hours on the estimate.

3. Replace. Replacing parts, sometimes shorthanded to ‘repl,’ is not a discretionary item on an estimate and is governed by industry standards or what shop folks call “book time.” If the book/software says it takes 3.5 hours to replace that bumper then that is what the insurance company will pay. No more and no less. It is pretty well standardized with only slight variations depending on which software is used and then it only differs by very little.

4. Sublet. Sometimes there are things that an auto body shop will send to someone else (typically a mechanic who takes care of more under the hood items) to perform and this is categorized as sublet. Popular things for shops to sublet out are air conditioner recharging and 4 wheel alignments when the suspension is damaged. The reason this is sent out typically is that the equipment and space required for these operations are not cost effective for a body shop. And when it comes to deeper engine repair, oil and paint don’t mix! Oil and grease can quickly ruin a paint job. So, shops that say they can do “everything” typically can’t do everything well.

5. Miscellaneous. Under this category will go small charges like “hazardous waste removal” (about once a month we pay someone to pick up and dispose of our hazardous waste in the safest way possible) and “car cover for overspray” which pays for paper, tape and plastic to cover the vehicle during the painting process so paint over spray doesn’t go all over the windows or adjacent panels.

How to Buy Auto Parts Online

Buying auto parts online can be extremely hit and miss. There are so many uncertain variables if you do not know exactly what you need. Choosing the right auto parts online store can be the difference between getting the right part at the right price or finding yourself chasing the proverbial rabbit down the hole. The tips and tricks presented here will help you have a pleasurable shopping experience online.

You Do Not Have to Be an Expert

It comes as no surprise that the past several years have been financially heavy for most people here in the US. This fiscal struggle is everywhere when you take a moment to focus on our spending habits. For instance, new vehicle sales have gone down considerably in the past 5 years while restoration of existing autos have gone up exponentially. These days, we are becoming DIY mechanics, replacing faulty auto parts with new ones as necessary. However, most people are not aware that they can save even more money by buying auto parts online instead of at their local store.

You Do Not Have To Be an Expert!

In years past, consulting with an expert before buying replacement auto parts was the only way to go. We had to trust what our local mechanic was saying as gospel.  Nowadays, with access to a world of information with the onset of the internet, provided you know a little bit about your car, it isn’t really necessary to start your search with your local mechanic. If you want to buy auto parts online you can do it provided you know the make, year and model of your vehicle. Buying replacement parts online is even easier if you happen to know the part number.

Save Time When You Buy Online

If you shop for new car parts locally your selections are limited in terms of price and quality. What’s more, you are not guaranteed to find the exact part you need. This is painfully true if you are shopping for an uncommon auto part. Shopping online for auto parts can be far more efficient in terms of getting quality and accurate results. That’s because there are dozens of online auto parts stores that deal in the sale of auto parts. This means you are likely to find the precise part you need, even if it is an unusual one.

Saving Time

If you shop at traditional venues for auto parts you might have to drive to several different places before you find the part you are looking for. Driving from one place to another takes time. If you shop online what would have taken hours if not days can be accomplished in thirty minutes or less. Therefore, if you have a busy life as most of us do,  shopping online for new parts definitely frees up your time to do what you need to be doing instead of shopping for your parts around town.

Save Money Buying Online

Let us suppose that you decide to buy a used 2001 Ford Mustang, but it needs a new suspension. If you shop locally for the shocks and struts, it will cost you $400 or more at retail pricing. If you shop online for the exact same suspension parts, you can get them for as little as $200. That is half the cost, and usually shipping is free. When you buy new parts online it cuts out the middle man. That’s what makes it so much cheaper.

Warning – Do Be Careful

If your car is in desperate need of a replacement car part immediately, then you will pay for that time sensitive need.  if you have a day or two to spare to allow for your purchase to arrive, it is a much better idea to shop online than it is to buy locally. However you must be careful to order exactly the right part the first time. If you have to send a part back because you ordered the wrong one, it could cause a significant delay. It is also a good idea to ensure that any website you consider buying auto parts from is legitimate before making any kind of purchase.

Trust in these tips and tricks when shopping for auto parts online and you will save time, money, and will enjoy greater satisfaction in knowing you accomplished your goal of getting your car back on the road for less.

1970 Chevelle SS Muscle Car Barn Find – First Look Value and Diagnostic Costs

Every car enthusiast dreams of a barn find. An untouched piece of automotive history sitting in a run-down barn in an open field filed away 30 40 years earlier. The view obscured by a door overgrown by vines. A barely visible hub cap or hood ornament. There are hundreds of signs that there might be something of value behind that fence. It is a story that you hear behind every great restoration project. My question is where does it all begin and how does a person move forward once that car is located.

I recently came across a 1970 Chevelle SS sitting under a carport. Doing a little research I learned it had been sitting there untouched since 1993. Upon closer inspection it was sheltered from the weather, for the most part. Everything looked like it was there: bumpers, emblems, motor, and glass. This was a complete car with the letters SS and numbers 396 printed down the side. Did I just happen upon a car worth $100,000 sitting between home insulation and a fire wood pile? Knowing very little about anything I needed to check a few vital numbers before I could let myself become overcome with sweaty palms weak knees heart pounding out of my chest pupils dilated all the signs of desire. First, is it for sale? After the go ahead with an asking price I needed to find out if this car was what it looked like. Vin, check. engine number stamp, check. Protect O Plate Numbers, Check. Everything matches. This is a real SS 350 hp big block American made muscle car. Sitting in front of me was one of the last unregulated power houses to come off the assembly line from the era of torque and horsepower. I had established that is was complete, now I needed to figure out if this was a $100,000 car or a $300 scrap pile. A close look over the car showed signs of neglect. Leeks and surface rust were on or in every panel. Rust in the rear corner panel, leeks in both doors, and the interior was shot.

Motor had been sitting untouched for 19 years without being cared for. The rear window had rusted completely out no thanks to the vinyl top. It was obvious that there would need to be a complete restoration. Rear corner panels $400 per side, trunk panel $100, roof panel $250 and that is just to replace the rear window. Cow hood, oh what a work of art but broken $600. Interior completely gone, interior kit $2500. Just to make it roll Rims and tires $2000. Rebuild motor $5000 Transmission $3000 rear-end $1500 brakes $500. Fuel system flushed new lines, new tank, and new carb. Everywhere I looked was a dollar sign, not one but thousands of dollar signs. This barn find was starting to look like a money pit. Stepping back wiping off the dirt and cobwebs I had to do a quick cost analysis.

What I quickly found when I got back to the front of the barn was I didn’t care. This car still had life and it is my responsibility as a man to make her come back. Flush the engine and radiator, rebuild the carb, run a fuel line to a milk jug add a fresh battery and turn that baby over. Blown exhaust gasket, leeks everywhere but she is alive. Now the adventure starts one bolt at a time. Keep a look out for the next update to see how this story grows with each new article.

How Easy Online Payday Loans Saved My Life!

It may be hard to believe, but easy online payday loans did in fact save my life. I’m sure there are other stories out there similar to mine, but this one is definitely an eye opener — as it shows what can happen when simply “waiting” for your next paycheck.

A few weeks ago, my car broke down and I was left without transportation. This was terrible because I, like most people, rely on my car to get to & from work. I didn’t have any money saved and it turned out that I needed some major work done on the car — it’s the price I pay for not paying enough attention to my automobile.

I had but 2 options to choose from: hitch a ride from a friend & co-worker whom lived in the opposite direction of my job & home, OR borrow the money from somewhere and take care of the repairs immediately. Like most would do, I simply decided to wait until my next payday to take care of the repairs and have my friend cart me from & to work.

When he pulled up the first day, I was already feeling guilty, especially considering that he was going WAY out of his usual routine just to pick me up. That guilt only increased when he told me he was up an hour earlier than usual in order to pick me up. Suffice it to say, I was feeling pretty bad and decided that this wasn’t going to work out for an entire week.

That following afternoon, after I got off work, I started looking into payday cash advances and short term fast cash loans. It turned out that I could apply and have the money I needed within just a few hours. Like most, I was a bit skeptical and decided not to be “suckered” into this likely scam too quickly. Rather than just believe what I read, I did a bit of research and found out that these same day cash advances weren’t scams at all and they actually help a lot of people all over the world.

In all honesty, I was blown away at how virtually anyone could apply for one of these loans within minutes — all they needed to have was a valid social security number, a checking account, and a job.

After discovering this, I started my search for a payday lender and found one in less than 10 minutes. I applied online for a loan of $500 and was approved in under an hour! I was then told that the money would be deposited into my checking account within a few hours and I would be able to use it that same day, if not the next morning. With this news, I called up a local car repair service and had them tow the car down to their shop and repair it. A few hours later, the car was completely repaired and I was handed a bill for $446.84 — which was just shy of my $500 loan. I wrote them a posted-dated check for the following day, thanked them for the repairs, and then I DROVE my car home.

How did this loan save my life? Well, you’re about to find out…..

Just 2 days later, my friend — the one that was driving me to & from work — was killed in a horrendous, freak car accident. What happened was a huge semi truck plowed into the PASSENGER side of his compact car and he was killed instantly. Had my vehicle not been repaired, I would have been in the car with him at the time of the accident. Hence, I would NOT be telling you this story right now.

Mastering The Basics: How To Change The Oil And Oil Filter

Not all of us can be a master mechanic and perform every service our car needs, but knowing how to perform basic services to maintain your car both saves you money and improves safety. When you know how your car works, you are better equipped to assess issues and possibly fix them without feeling helpless. One of the most commonly performed at-home maintenance services and one of the most important things you can do to keep your car in good condition is changing the motor oil and oil filter. Doing this yourself is relatively inexpensive and easy.

Don’t Ignore The Owner’s Manual

If you’ve always wanted to learn how change your car’s oil and filter, this guide can help! Just remember to always reference your car’s owner’s manual for any vehicle-specific details. The mileage intervals when they need to be changed are listed in the owner’s manual. Also in the owner’s manual is the grade and amount of motor oil you’ll need, as well as any requirements for the filter.

Necessary Equipment

Here’s what you’ll need to be an at-home mechanic, at least as far as the oil change is concerned:

  • Motor oil
  • Oil filter
  • Socket wrench
  • Oil filter wrench, in case you can’t loosen it by hand
  • Funnel
  • Oil pan
  • Mat, newspaper, or big, flat piece of cardboard to catch any oil spills under the car
  • Cleaning rags

Step-by-Step

  1. Drain the old motor oil.
    • Start your car and let it run for a minute or two, or drive it around the block so the motor oil warms up, which will allow it drain out smoothly. After the warm up, park your car in the driveway or garage, ON LEVEL GROUND.
    • If your car is too low to the ground to slide under, you’ll need to jack it up and place jack stands before you get under it (jack stands are a must!).
    • Prop up the hood and loosen the cap on the oil tank or else it won’t drain well.
    • Place your spill mat or cardboard under the vehicle and slide on under with the oil pan.
    • Locate the drain plug.
    • Place the pan on top of newspaper/cardboard below and slightly ahead of the drain plug (the stream will release farther out when you first remove the drain plug).
    • Loosen the drain plug with the socket wrench, turning it counterclockwise, and then remove the plug slowly by hand and let the motor oil drain out. Caution: Oil may be hot.
    • Once the oil slows down to a drip, reinstall the drain plug and tighten it with the socket wrench (just a quarter turn clockwise should be sufficient).
  2. Replace the oil filter.
    • Keep the oil pan under the car and find the oil filter.
    • Loosen it with the filter wrench and remove by hand.
    • Before installing the new oil filter, apply a little motor oil to the new gasket to optimize the seal and prevent the gasket from cracking or sticking.
    • Install and tighten the new oil filter BY HAND.
  3. Add the new motor oil.
    • Remove the cap of the oil tank, and, using a funnel, pour the new motor oil into the tank in the amount dictated by the owner’s manual. When finished, replace the oil cap and wipe away any spilled motor oil.
    • Start your engine and run it for a minute to allow the new motor oil to circulate thoroughly.
    • Time to check the oil level. Turn off the car and remove and wipe oil off the dipstick.
    • Insert and remove the dipstick and check that the oil level is correct. Assuming all is well, screw the cap back on and you’re done!
  4. Clean up and recycle your motor oil.
    • Pour the old motor oil from the pan into a used oil container and put the old oil filter into a plastic bag.
    • You cannot throw your old oil into the trash. Take it to a auto supply store or a lube shop to recycle.
    • Write down the date you performed the oil change and the amount of miles the car had so you know when your next change is due.

And you’re done!